CB 276: Dušan Makavejev’s “Man Is Not a Bird,” 1965.

CB 274: Usama Alshaibi’s “American Arab,” 2013.

Alshaibi: Praise be to no god. Usama Alshaibi. I demand you, demand me.

This week’s writeup for CINE-FILE. The Chicago Underground Film Festival continues through 4/6 at The Logan Theatre.

CB 274: Usama Alshaibi’s “American Arab,” 2013.

Alshaibi: Praise be to no god. Usama Alshaibi. I demand you, demand me.

This week’s writeup for CINE-FILE. The Chicago Underground Film Festival continues through 4/6 at The Logan Theatre.

CB 273: William Klein’s “Mr. Freedom,” 1969.

Mr. Freedom: Thank you. You’ve been magnificent. I’m very happy to announce that we’ve destroyed at least half of the country … I hope that now they’ll understand that aggression does not pay.

This week’s writeup for CINE-FILE.

CB 272: Andrew Bujalski’s “Mutual Appreciation,” 2005.

CB 270: Guido van Driel’s “The Resurrection of a Bastard,” 2013.

This week’s writeup for CINE-FILE. The17th Annual European Union Film Festival runs 3/7 - 4/3 at the Gene Siskel Film Center, presenting the Chicago premiere of 64 new films from 26 EU nations.

CB 269: Carl Th. Dreyer’s “Day of Wrath,” 1943.

Anne: We have sinned together. And we must also stand together. If Marte accuses me, will you stand by me?

Martin: I promise.

CB 268: Jacques Demy’s “Donkey Skin,” 1970.

The King: Have you a daughter?

The Scholar: No, unfortunately. But if I did, I should certainly marry her.

This week’s writeup for CINE-FILE. Pictured above is Wiktor Gorka’s 1973 Polish poster for the film, which as Adrian Curry aptly puts it, “gives the tale of threatened incest a necessary note of blind panic.”

CB 266: Brian De Palma’s “Body Double,” 1984.

Detective McLean: I’m not gonna hold you Scully, I got witnesses to back up your story. But I want you to think real hard about this: As far as I’m concerned you’re the real reason Gloria Revelle got murdered.

This week’s writeup for CINE-FILE.

CB 265: Josef von Sternberg’s “The Last Command,” 1928.

Intertitle: And so the backwash of a tortured nation had carried still another extra to Hollywood.

"One time when I told [Brent] how to act, she threw a shoe at me." -Sternberg

CB 264: Josef von Sternberg’s “Underworld,” 1927.

Intertitle: Elsewhere the night deepened into silence and rest. But here the brutal din of cheap music—booze—hate—lust—made a devil’s carnival.

This week’s writeup for CINE-FILE.

CB 263: Andrew Bujalski’s “Beeswax,” 2009.

Lauren: I’ve got to pee and go to bed. But I do have some stories to tell you; the saddest and quickest of which is that A.C. told me that Daniel had died. Some heart thing, I don’t know, some kind of unexpected heart failure. Maybe drug related, maybe not. This is my first boyfriend from high school.

Jeannie: I’ve never kissed a dead guy.

Merrill: Maybe if you were a better girlfriend in high school he’d still be alive today… That sounded horrible, that came out totally wrong. I’m sorry. Why would I say that?

Lauren: It’s always good to see you Merrill.

CB 262: Andrew Bujalski’s “Computer Chess,” 2013.

Mike Papageorge: It’s pathetic really. I’d be willing to bet that you and I are the only ones here who even understand that programming has a feminine side. Anyway, I would love to stay in your room if you have an extra bed.

Last night; vertigo at Vertigo.

Last night; vertigo at Vertigo.

CB 261: Carl Th. Dreyer’s “Vampyr,” 1932.

Before there were Luis Buñuel, Robert Bresson, Ingmar Bergman, or Andrei Tarkovsky (not to mention Lars von Trier, Carlos Reygadas, and Guy Maddin), there was Carl Theodor Dreyer (1889–1968), the original solitary, uncompromising film artist.” -J. Hoberman